Ensuring better oral health for the whole family

Ensuring better oral health for the whole family
When it comes to increasing oral health awareness in the family, it’s important to remember that brushing and flossing aren’t enough to attain or maintain good dental health. 98% of every man, woman, and child in the United States has some form of oral disease. And among those folks, 90% of adults and 65% of 15-year-olds specifically have signs of active gum disease. So if brushing and flossing alone created oral health and most people did at least one of these things habitually, wouldn’t these numbers be much, much lower? Parents want the best for their children at all times. For example, many of us were raised on Twinkies and Lucky Charms (actually, I preferred Ding Dongs and Trix 🙂 –just name your poison). However, parents today want to give their children the finest start possible, especially if they themselves did not have the best nutritious start. Circling back to our oral hygiene routine, it’s vital to note that children learn a great deal from seeing their parents go about their daily lives. As a result, taking charge of our dental health is the best thing we can do to enhance oral health for everyone in the family.

What is conscious flossing?

The term “conscious flossing” describes bringing awareness and attention to the routine habit of flossing. By paying attention while flossing, a lot can be learned about what’s going on in our mouths, and this information can have a huge impact on the ability to create greater oral health.

How to floss consciously

1.  Start with a piece of floss that’s long enough for you to be able to use a new segment of floss between each set of teeth. 2.  Stop and look at the floss after each flossing point. Look for any discoloration on the floss. Any color (blood or yellowish color) is a clear sign that you have an active infection in the gum pockets around those teeth. 3.  Step three requires some courage, so be strong! 🙂 Smell the floss. Yep, smell it after each contact you clean. A bad smell on the floss is also a sign of an active infection in the gum pockets around those teeth. And yes, if you find any smelly floss, that directly contributes to the smell from your mouth that your partner has come to recognize as normal. 4.  As you floss, feel for any pain, sensitivity, or signs of swelling.

Wrapping up…

Once your children see you floss consciously, they will begin to do the same. Everyone in the family will have a better understanding of how to create greater oral health in their own life. That’s what we call a win/win for all!!! https://orawellness.com/how-to-create-greater-oral-health-for-the-whole-family/

Beyond Brushing – Taking care of your oral health

Beyond Brushing - Taking care of your oral health
Brushing your teeth every morning and night doesn’t guarantee you’re giving your mouth all the attention it needs. Having a thorough dental care routine that goes beyond just brushing your teeth, and ensuring you have the right tools in your bathroom cupboard, can take your oral health to another level and give you a good clean. Here are our top tips for ensuring a healthy mouth and enamel.

Why is enamel so important?

The enamel on your teeth is a protective outer layer on each tooth. It is the hardest and most highly mineralized substance in your body. Every time you eat and drink, you expose your teeth to acids and bacteria that are in your food. This would seriously harm teeth if it weren’t for tooth enamel. It’s the most visible part of the tooth, and it’s what people see when you smile or open your mouth. When enamel is damaged or starts to decay, you cannot restore it: enamel simply doesn’t grow back. Sensitivity to hot and cold foods will occur. Here are a few oral hygiene steps to follow to ensure the maximum upkeep of tooth enamel.

Brush regularly (but not too hard)

Many people brush regularly, but simply don’t brush enough for their teeth to stay clean. It is recommended to brush just before bed and at one other time during the day with fluoride toothpaste. Using an electric toothbrush is better for you and your enamel than manual toothbrushes for several reasons. They are constantly rotating and cleaning as you move over your teeth and they rotate at a far higher speed than you could achieve with your hand, providing a deeper clean. Thus they can help to get rid of surface stains without applying too much pressure on the tooth’s surface.

Use a mouthwash

Drinks high in sugar, like fizzy drinks, are the number one culprits as they are tremendously high in sugar and very acidic. This combination accelerates the loss of your tooth enamel. A good mouthwash can go where toothbrushes and floss can’t to rid your mouth of the same debris that irritates the gum line and causes gingivitis. Add a quality alcohol-free mouthwash to your oral care regime to get the most thorough clean you can, even when you’re on the go.

Pick the correct toothpaste

One common misconception when it comes to oral hygiene and tooth enamel is that teeth whitening formulas are healthy. However, whitening toothpaste that contains peroxide can be too harsh on your enamel due to the peroxide content which can damage your enamel and can cause increased and unwanted sensitivity. Instead, choose a toothpaste that gently removes stains without the use of peroxide. The vital ingredient to protecting your enamel is fluoride, which helps to remineralize your enamel and protects your teeth’s sensitivity.

Floss properly

Like brushing, flossing must be done properly so that, when you reach between teeth, you get to the plaque not reached by your toothbrush. Brushing only gets around 50% of the plaque buildup, so spending a few minutes each day flossing helps to get to those hard-to-reach areas. Ideally, use a floss tape that can be more gentle on gums, and make sure to floss morning and evening. https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/brushing-and-beyond-taking-care-of-your-oral-health

Cleaning between teeth: the secret behind a healthy smile

Cleaning between teeth: the secret behind a healthy smile
When you think about maintaining a healthy mouth, brushing your teeth should be the top priority. Twice daily toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste is the cornerstone to a healthy smile, but there is one simple addition that can truly transform how healthy your mouth is – and that is interdental cleaning. While toothbrushing is the most effective way to keep your teeth clean, it only reaches 60% of the tooth’s surfaces. Using interdental brushes to clean in between the gaps in your teeth is one of the easiest and most important things you can do to change your smile for the better. Why interdental cleaning is important Dental plaque can build up between the teeth where a toothbrush cannot get to. Over time, this can lead to tooth decay, gum inflammation, and bad breath. To prevent this from happening, it is good to use an interdental brush as part of your daily cleaning routine. An interdental brush is a small brush specially designed to clean between your teeth, where a regular toothbrush does not reach. Daily use of an interdental brush, in addition to regular tooth brushing, is an easy and effective way to keep your gums and teeth fresh and healthy. It’s recommended that you clean between your teeth every day, to keep your mouth fresh and healthy. When you first start cleaning between your teeth, your gums may feel a bit sore and might bleed but do not stop because bleeding gums are often a sign of gum inflammation. If you do not notice an improvement within a few days, contact your dental professional. Picking the right size Interdental brushes come in many different sizes, and it can be difficult to know which one is most suitable for your mouth. For the best advice, ask a dental professional for their recommendation. In the meantime, here are a few tips to get you started… · Look in the mirror and insert the brush between the teeth, close to the gums. Start with the smallest size and work up until the brush bristles touch the tooth surface and the gum tissue. · The brush should have a snug fit but the wire, although plastic coated, should not touch the sides of the teeth or the gums. Never force the brush into space. · Once inserted, move the interdental brush to its full length back and forth about 2-3 times. Make sure to clean all the spaces between the teeth once a day. · You are likely to need two to three different sizes or the combination of one or two brushes and floss – it all depends on the spaces between the teeth, which normally vary throughout the mouth. How to use interdental brushes To get the most out of interdental cleaning, it is all about the correct technique. The good news is that using interdental brushes is relatively easy to pick up. Once mastered, it is a healthy habit that will last a lifetime. 1.         Use a straight interdental brush between the front teeth Insert the brush gently between the teeth. Do not force the brush into space; work it in gently or choose a smaller size. Move the interdental brush full length back and forth a few times. 2.         If using a small interdental brush on the back teeth If using a small interdental brush you can curve the soft neck slightly. By adding pressure with your finger, it makes it easier to reach between the back teeth. Or try a long-handled interdental brush. 3.         If using a bigger interdental brush on the back teeth When using interdental brushes of a larger size, access between the back teeth may be improved if you slightly curve the wire. The interdental brush will last longer if you do not straighten or bend the brush at another angle. https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/cleaning-between-teeth-the-secret-behind-a-truly-healthy-smile

Causes of Tooth Decay

Causes of Tooth Decay

It’s critically important to help heal the misunderstandings that our culture has around how to navigate the path to greater oral health. 

 

Let’s study 5 aspects of how diet and nutrition can impact oral health. 

5 dietary recommendations to positively impact oral health

  • Have sufficient fat-soluble vitamins in our diet (vitamins A, D, E, and K2)
  • Have plenty of vitamins B and C in our diet
  • Have sufficient minerals in our diet
  • Avoid too many foods that are high in acid
  • Avoid eating too much sugar (in all forms) 

In this article, let’s explore the inner workings of diet’s impact on oral health.

 

To put into perspective the role that diet plays in helping or undermining our oral health, this first article is going to explore the work of Dr. Ralph Steinman. 

 

Dr. Steinman was a dental researcher in the 1970s who did extensive research to determine the cause of tooth decay. He published his work in his amazing book, Dentinal Fluid Transport. He conducted tens of thousands of experiments on lab rats to determine the cause of tooth decay. What he found may surprise you.

 

What is dentinal fluid flow? (and how does it impact my oral health?)

 

Fundamentally, what Dr. Steinman discovered is that our teeth are alive.

 

Contrary to the popular cultural belief that teeth are like small rocks, the fact is that our teeth have fluid running through them, and this is called ‘dentinal fluid flow’.

 

The dentin is the layer of tissue in each of our teeth that’s just between the hard outer (enamel) surface and the inner soft tooth pulp.

 

Dr. Steinman discovered that this dentinal fluid flow is part of the blood circulation that goes into and out of each of our teeth.

 

He also discovered that when the dentinal fluid is flowing from the inside of the tooth outward, the teeth are very resistant to decay. However, when the fluid flow reverses and flows from the outer surface of the tooth towards the inner portion of the tooth, decay sets in very quickly.

 

The thug bugs in our mouths contribute to tooth decay. If the dentinal fluid is flowing the healthy way, this flow prevents the thug bugs from being able to decay the teeth; the flow washes them out of the teeth. It’s like they have to swim upstream to get into the teeth. On the other hand, if the dentinal fluid flow reverses, then it’s like the thug bugs get a free pass on a highway right into our teeth! 

Dr. Steinman found that dentinal fluid flow is controlled by the parotid gland, a part of our salivary system that is located in the region behind our lower jaw.  Then he discovered that the parotid gland is controlled by the part of our brain called the hypothalamus.  For the sake of simplicity, let’s refer to this relationship between dentinal fluid flow, the parotid gland, and the hypothalamus as ‘dentinal fluid flow’.

With these pieces in place, Dr. Steinman’s work helped us to understand that a healthy, balanced diet not only helps to control the thug bugs responsible for dental decay, but also helps to maintain a healthy, living tissue within the teeth that can help resist decay through healthy dentinal fluid flow. 

 

https://orawellness.com/why-do-teeth-decay/

11 tips to cut down on sugar

11 tips to cut down on sugar
It comes as no surprise that sugar-related dental problems are still the most widespread cause of poor oral health and disease. The message is clear and simple though, reducing the amount of sugar that is in our diets will help to reduce the damage it can cause to our teeth, with the bonus of improving our waistlines along the way. With sugar-related dental problems being one of the most common complaints when visiting the dentist, Dr. Nigel Carter OBE, CEO at the Oral Health Foundation, shares his top tips to help with our ever-growing addiction to sugar:

1.Sugar by any other name is still sugar

When we think of sugar we probably picture the white stuff you pop in our tea. But there are many ‘hidden’ sugars in lots of things we would not even think of. Sugar can go by many names and recognizing them is the first step to avoiding them. There are too many to list but some to look out for are; sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, molasses, hydrolyzed starch, and corn syrup.

2.Have a smarter breakfast

A certain celebrity chef recently brought attention to the dangerously high levels of sugar in some breakfast cereals, with some shockingly made up of almost a third of the sugar. Switching out for a lower sugar cereal or one with no added sugar, and not adding any yourselves, will have a massive impact on your dental health and your health overall. Filling up at breakfast time is also a great way to avoid those unhealthy snacks throughout the day.

3.Snack happy

It’s 10:30 and we get that urge. It’s a little too far away from lunch and we need something to tide us over. Don’t reach for the biscuit barrel, a handful of nuts will provide that energy boost you need. Remember it’s not only about how much sugar we eat when it comes to your teeth it’s also about how often, so try opting for a sugar-free alternative whenever possible.

4.Fat-free is not trouble-free

Many products are marketed as a ‘healthy alternative’, but those claims on the packaging are only telling part of the story. Often products such as fat-free yogurts still contain high levels of sugars in the form of fructose or refined sugar.

5.Work out some ground rules

Let’s be honest, we don’t need a sweet dessert every day! By setting a set of simple ground rules we can make some simple lifestyle changes that can have a huge effect. Simple things like not eating in the hour before you go to bed, avoiding adding sugar to anything, and making sure we avoid dessert a few times a week soon add up.

6.Get fresh

When it comes to our teeth fresh whole foods are best, this all comes down to stickiness. By smashing up a banana and strawberry into a smoothie it releases the sugars which can coat the whole tooth, even in the tiny gaps, eating them whole helps to avoid this problem. And when it comes to stickiness dried fruit is a big no-no, this stuff can get right in those gaps giving the sugar a huge amount of time to cause problems.

7.Set a quota

When it comes to our teeth, it’s not only about how much sugar we eat, it’s how often we have it. It takes an hour for our mouth to return to a neutral state after eating or drinking and every time we have another mouthful that time starts again. Constant grazing can leave us with a toothless grin so if we do need a sugar fix, keep it to mealtimes and give our mouth a break.

8.Hit the hay early

Being a night owl can spell bad news for our mouth and this is all down to a routine. People who stay up late are more likely to skip brushing before bed and with the added midnight snacking this could spell disaster for our teeth.

9.The most important meal of the day

How many of us have skipped breakfast and then yearn for that sugary fix to get us through the day? This comes down again to giving our mouths a break to recover, having a filling and nutritious breakfast is the best way to start your day right.

10.Drinking like a fish

Whether it’s that pint of cider, a glass of prosecco, or even a cheeky G&T, the sugar in them can have a huge impact on our oral health. Try to moderate the number of alcoholic drinks you have and also have some water nearby to help wash down your tipple of choice. It helps wash some of the sugar from the mouth and our head will thank you for the next day too.

11.Keep an eye on your coffee order

Our double chocolaty chip crème frappuccino or tiramisu latte with extra whipped cream from our favorite coffee place may be delicious, and fun to say, but let’s be honest we know it’s laden with sugar. If we do need a caffeine fix and have a sweet tooth try to keep it to mealtimes, or we could just stick with an Americano or espresso. https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/11-tips-to-cut-down-on-sugar-ending-our-addiction-to-sugar

How eating disorders can affect your mouth

How eating disorders can affect your mouth

Written by- Oral Health Foundation

How eating disorders can affect your mouth: and how your dental team can help spot early signs

Eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder all have negative effects on the mouth, their symptoms can range from slight to severe and dental professionals are often among the first to identify possible red flags.

Multiple studies have shown eating disorders can affect oral health. That’s why the Oral Health Foundation is supporting Eating Disorders Awareness Week.

In this blog post, let’s look at what the main symptoms of each condition are, how they can affect the health of your mouth, and how your dental team can help you.

 

What is anorexia?

People with anorexia nervosa limit their intake of food and drink and have a fear of gaining weight. Many people with anorexia attribute their self-worth to their caloric intake and punish themselves for eating too much or eating the “wrong types” of foods.

What is bulimia?

Bulimia nervosa is a binge eating disorder and is diagnosed based on binge-purge patterns of eating. To meet the criteria for a diagnosis of bulimia you must be binging (taking in an excessive amount of calories in one sitting) and purging (expelling food/calories through excessive exercise, taking laxatives, or forcing yourself to vomit) for a prolonged period of time on a regular basis.

People with bulimia may also experience symptoms such as tiredness, bloating and/or constipation, abdominal pain, and irregular menstrual cycles.

What is a binge eating disorder?

Binge eaters have previously been classified as food addicts. They will often take in large quantities of food and/or drink without feeling like they are in control of what they are doing, these binges can be planned ahead of time with the sufferer buying “special” foods to binge on, or they could be spontaneous.

Binge eaters are not “overindulging” on foods or simply just having large portions, these are not enjoyable experiences and often cause a lot of distress and embarrassment for sufferers.

Characteristics of a binge eating episode include eating faster than normal, eating until feeling uncomfortably full, eating large amounts of food when you don’t feel hungry, eating alone due to embarrassment at the amount being eaten, and feelings of disgust, shame, or guilt during/after the binge.

How can eating disorders affect the health of your mouth?

 

All of these eating disorders affect your health, have negative effects on sufferers’ bodies, and should be treated as serious health conditions.

Potential negative effects of vitamin and nutrient deficiencies can cause the body to shut down and not function properly and that will also be reflected in the mouth. Oral signs of eating disorders can include:

 

  • Enamel erosion
  • Dry mouth
  • Enlarged salivary glands
  • Cracked/dry lips
  • Mouth sores
  • Tooth decay
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Bruising and/or injury to the mouth

 

https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/how-eating-disorders-can-affect-your-mouth

Teeth Grinding

Teeth Grinding
Written by- https://www.mouthhealthy.org/ Teeth grinding is called bruxism, and often it happens as you sleep. Teeth grinding can be caused not just by stress and anxiety but also by sleep disorders, an abnormal bite, or teeth that are missing or crooked. A study in the November 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that teeth grinding is also associated with alcohol and tobacco use. People who drink alcohol and smokers are approximately twice as likely to grind their teeth. In a September 2020 report, the ADA Health Policy Institute found that more than half of dentists surveyed saw an increase of patients with dental conditions often associated with stress: Teeth grinding and clenching, chipped and cracked teeth, and symptoms of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder such as jaw pain and headaches. The symptoms of teeth grinding include:
  • dull headaches
  • jaw soreness
  • teeth that are painful or loose
  • fractured teeth
Your dentist can fit you with a mouth guard to protect your teeth during sleep. In some cases, your dentist or physician may recommend taking a muscle relaxant before bedtime. If stress is the cause you need to find a way to relax. Meditation, counseling, and exercise can help reduce stress and anxiety. Teeth grinding is also common in children. However, because their teeth and jaws change and grow so quickly it is not usually a damaging habit that requires treatment and most outgrow it by adolescence. Although in adults teeth grinding is often the result of stress, the same is not always true with children. Other possible causes of teeth grinding in children include:
  • irritation in the mouth
  • allergies
  • misaligned teeth
If you’re concerned about your child’s teeth grinding, ask your dentist about the potential causes and, if necessary, the possible solutions. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/teeth-grinding

7 Things Your Dentist Wants You to Know about COVID-19 vaccines

7 Things Your Dentist Wants You to Know about COVID-19 vaccines
Oral health is essential to your overall health. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, your dentist has been working to put your health and safety first by taking extra steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the dental office. 1.     COVID-19 Vaccines are Safe and Effective  As doctors of oral health, reliable scientific information is important to us when recommending treatments for our patients. While these vaccines were developed in a shorter time frame than some other vaccines, it’s important to know that the science behind them was not rushed. These vaccines were tested by thousands of people to make sure they work and are safe for patients. The Food and Drug Administration reviewed the data from the tests and authorized them for emergency use after determining they are safe and effective for the public. The CDC has set up expanded safety monitoring systems like the V-Safe smartphone tool to monitor vaccinations in real-time, as an additional safety measure. 2.     The Vaccine has some side effects COVID-19 vaccines cannot give you COVID-19. They might, however, come with some side effects that make you feel uncomfortable for a short time. Because vaccines teach your body how to recognize and fight off a COVID-19 infection, you might feel some of the symptoms you’d get if your body were fighting off the real virus, such as a fever, according to the CDC. While unpleasant, this is a sign the vaccine is working in your body. 3.     You Should Still Get the Vaccine Even If You’ve Had COVID-19 Those who have recovered from COVID-19 have some natural immunity that may protect them from getting sick again, but some people get re-infected. It’s unclear how long natural immunity to COVID-19 lasts and it can vary from person to person. The CDC recommends that people who’ve had COVID-19 still get the vaccine. 4.     Get All Recommended Doses If you are receiving the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, you need two doses to get the same level of efficacy seen in the clinical trials. For the Pfizer vaccine, the second dose is recommended three weeks after the first. For the Moderna vaccine, the second dose is recommended four weeks after the first. And if you get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you only need a single dose. 5.     Vaccine Supply Is Increasing While the first available doses of the vaccine were set aside for healthcare workers and other essential workers, the federal government has called for the vaccines to be available to all U.S. adults by April 19, which means you’re likely eligible now. Check with your local health department to find out where it is being administered. 6.     You’ll Still Need to Wear a Mask Vaccines are just one layer of protection available in this pandemic, so it’s not time to get rid of your mask indoors just yet. Here’s why: a vaccine will protect you from getting sick from the virus, but it’s not yet known if it will prevent you from spreading the virus to others. That’s why the CDC continues to recommend that people wear masks, wash their hands frequently and avoid crowds even after getting vaccinated. Your dentist will also continue to require masks at your appointment. However, the CDC says fully vaccinated people can now participate in more activities, like traveling and visiting with friends and family inside a home or private setting. 7.     You Can Get the Vaccine If You Are Planning to Get Pregnant Whether you are planning to get pregnant soon or in the future, you should still get the vaccine when it is available to you. The CDC states there is no evidence that the antibodies created from COVID-19 vaccines will cause problems with a pregnancy. The CDC also says there is no evidence that fertility issues are a side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine or any other vaccine.  https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/covid-19-vaccines

Five oral health faux pas you never knew were bad for you

In an era where people say appearance is everything, having a good smile is key! Many of them know to brush twice a day & stay away from sugar, Read more...
Written by-  George Bushell In an era where people say appearance is everything, having a good smile is key! Many of them know to brush twice a day and stay away from sugar but are you sure you’ve thought of everything? The Oral Health Foundation is providing the following information to those who’d like to make sure their dental health routine isn’t full of holes! 1. Spit Don’t Rinse Fluoride is very good for your teeth. You’re likely to find it in most of the toothpaste on the shelf at your local supermarket. To give your teeth the best chance of staying pearly white, you don’t want to lose the full benefit of brushing with fluoride toothpaste. So, after you’ve finished brushing, spit out the excess, and then do not rinse. Let the fluoride work its magic after you’ve finished brushing! 2. Mind the loo! This is something you might not think of too much, but where you keep your toothbrush when you aren’t using it is very important. If you keep your brush a little too close to your toilet, every time someone flushes, some of the sprays will fly out the toilet and may land on your toothbrush. It’s always a good idea to move the toothbrush back to a safe distance after brushing. 3. Sharing is a no-go It doesn’t matter how close you are, or if you’re related, if you want your oral health routine to be air-tight, you should be the only person who uses your toothbrush. No exceptions. Not just because you can get colds and blood-borne diseases from people you share your brush with but also because you could be sharing your germs with others! Nobody is perfect, keep your germs to yourself, just like your toothbrush! 4. Brushing is NOT a quick fix Have you ever had a drink of something sugary or acidic right before bed and go to brush your teeth straight after you finish? You’d think it was a good idea, but you’d be wrong. Consuming anything even remotely bad for your teeth makes them weaker and if you brush straight away you could be brushing away fragments of your enamel. That can lead to toothache and increased sensitivity. Instead, give it an hour and then brush with fluoride toothpaste for two minutes as the last thing at night. In the meantime, read a book, catch up on your favorite TV series, or do those chores you’ve been putting off all week! 5. There IS such a thing as brushing too much! The enamel of your teeth is one of the hardest substances in your body – but it isn’t indestructible. Again, it might sound like a good idea to brush hard to provide the most thorough clean but being tough on your teeth can do more harm than good. By all means, be firm with your teeth and make sure you clean every tooth but there is no need to go crazy, whether that means brushing too hard or for too long. There’s a lot more to your oral health than you might think. Hopefully, you’ve gained a new perspective on how you can improve your dental hygiene at home, whether that be closing the lid of the toilet more often or deciding to buy a new toothbrush for your loved one. https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/five-oral-health-faux-pas-you-never-knew-were-bad-for-you

5 Fun Ways to Welcome the Tooth Fairy

For generations, the Tooth Fairy has left a small gift for children who hid their fallen baby teeth under their pillow. Read more…
Written by- https://www.mouthhealthy.org/ For generations, the Tooth Fairy has left a small gift for children who hid their fallen baby teeth under their pillow. This charming tradition is the perfect time to help kids learn more about taking care of their teeth. Here are 5 delightful and inexpensive ways to embrace this magical spirit with the whole family.

1. A receipt for your child’s tooth

This little document can be left in your child’s bedroom as a remembrance of the event. Buy a receipt pad and write it out yourself. Include your child’s name, the date, a description of the tooth received, and the reward, plus a small note such as: “Thank you for this lovely tooth! I can see that you are brushing every day. Keep up the good work!”

2. A tooth fairy dish 

Here’s a sweet alternative to the under-the-pillow trick (and one that is much easier to access): help your child choose or create a special dish to keep their teeth. Visit a local thrift shop or housewares store to find one, or paint your own at a local ceramics studio. Talk with your child about what she or he thinks might please the Tooth Fairy’s eye … perhaps one that is shiny and bright, like a healthy smile!

3. A keepsake book

A simple blank notebook can be turned into a lasting record of Tooth Fairy’s visits. Invite your child to choose one at an office supply store or bookstore. You can have fun decorating the notebook with your child’s name, hometown and any other details s/he would like the Tooth Fairy to know. Have your child write the Tooth Fairy a note before bed every time he or she loses a tooth. When you leave your child’s gift behind, record the date and add a little note, such as: “This is a very handsome tooth! Did you know you’re on your way to having 32 grownup teeth someday?”

4. A bright-smile calendar

The Tooth Fairy’s visit is a great time to engage kids in healthy dental habits. Along with the Tooth Fairy’s gift, leave a brushing calendar in your child’s room as an extra gift. You can also make it reusable by laminating it at your local office-supply store and provide a colorful dry-erase marker for your child to record each time he or she brushes, flosses, or visits the dentist.

5. A Tooth Fairy “Smilestone” scrapbook page

It can be fun to record how your child’s smile changes as baby teeth fall out and grownup teeth come in. Create a milestone keepsake album of “smilestones” to memorialize each visit from the Tooth Fairy. If you want to make your own, choose an album from the dollar or craft store — or have fun making one together with colored paper, stickers, yarn, and other supplies. You can also just add a scrapbook page to your baby book. Talk with your child about the experience of losing a tooth and capture memories in the pages of the album. Leave it out in your child’s bedroom for the Tooth Fairy to enjoy, too, and consider sharing with the dentist at your next checkup! https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/playing-the-tooth-fairy